Current ADRC Projects

1 July 2018 — 30 June 2023

The National Stigma Report Card is a world-leading study into how stigma and discrimination affect people living with complex mental health issues.

This is our flagship project, and is conducted in partnership with the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne, with the support of the Paul Ramsay Foundation.

The National Stigma Report Card findings strongly reinforce the importance of organisations and individuals continuing to collaborate to build an Australia – and a world – free from stigma and discrimination.

Explore the findings

The National Stigma Report Card findings were launched on 12 October 2020.

The launch webinar featured insights and reflections on the research from:

  • people with lived experience of complex mental health issues
  • researchers
  • others committed to reducing stigma and discrimination and improving the lives of all Australians living with complex mental health issues.

You can return to watch this recording of the webinar at any time.

Our Turn to Speak

A national survey, Our Turn to Speak, was launched to understand people’s experiences and what needs to change to ensure all Australians live long and fulfilling lives, free from stigma and discrimination.

The survey, one of the first to look so comprehensively at this issue in Australia, explored how stigma and discrimination affects people with complex mental health issues across many aspects of their lives. 

For many people, participating in the survey represented the first time they have had the opportunity to reflect on and share their experiences in such a holistic way.

The Our Turn to Speak survey ran between October 2019 and March 2020, during which period 1,912 people from across Australia took part online, over the phone or in person.

Through the survey, people living with complex mental health issues shared their experiences of how stigma and discrimination affect 14 aspects of their everyday lives:

  • Relationships
  • Employment
  • Healthcare services
  • Social media
  • Mental healthcare services
  • Mass media
  • Welfare and social services
  • Education and training
  • Financial and insurance services
  • Housing and homelessness services
  • Cultural, faith or spiritual practices and communities
  • Sports, community groups and volunteering
  • Public and recreational spaces
  • Legal and justice services

The survey was open to any adult living in Australia who had experienced at least one of the following complex mental health issues in the previous 12 months:

  • schizophrenia spectrum disorders
    (such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or schizophreniform disorder)
  • bipolar and related disorders
  • personality disorders
    (such as but not limited to borderline personality disorder)
  • obsessive-compulsive and related disorders
    (such as OCD, body-dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania or hoarding disorder)
  • post-traumatic stress disorder
  • dissociative disorders
  • eating disorders
    (such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, and binge-eating disorder)
  • severe and treatment-resistant depression and anxiety requiring multi-agency support.

The findings of the survey are presented in the National Stigma Report Card. It draws on the insights from the almost 2,000 people who participated in survey.

Overall, the findings speak to a pervasive pattern of stigma and discrimination that negatively affects the lives of Australians living with complex mental health issues.

Team members

  • Dr Michelle Blanchard
    Deputy CEO, SANE Australia and Director, Anne Deveson Research Centre
  • Dr Christopher Groot
    Research Lead
  • Dr Imogen Rehm
    Research Fellow
  • Dr Cal Andrews
    Research Fellow
  • Beth Hobern
    PhD Candidate and Research Assistant
  • Elise Carrotte 
    PhD Candidate and Senior Research and Evaluation Coordinator 
  • Lisa Sweeney
    Head of Policy and Advocacy
  • Rikki Morgan
    Communications Specialist – Research and Advocacy
  • Hannah Green
    Communications Specialist – Research and Advocacy
  • Ali Glynn
    Project Support Officer


More information

Visit nationalstigmareportcard.com.au to explore the findings and for more information about the National Stigma Report Card.

Additional Info

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  • Category Title National Stigma Report Card
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    World-leading research into how stigma and discrimination affect people living with complex mental health issues.

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  • Category Image Alt Text National Stigma Report Card

Additional Info

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  • Category Title Hocking Fellowship Program
  • Category Text Grants to support projects or research into complex mental health issues.
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  • Category Image Alt Text The Hocking Fellowship Program

You are not alone is an online resource that provides information and advice to support those who care for someone who has attempted suicide, or is at risk of doing so.

This innovative and evidence-based resource was created in collaboration with people who have supported a partner, relative, or friend after a suicide attempt. Their voices and stories feature throughout the website. Their lived experience serves as a reminder that although there is no single way to respond to or support someone after they’ve attempted suicide, there are many who have been through this situation.

Go to the resource.

The Better Support project

You are not alone is the final product of the Better Support project, led by SANE Australia, with the support of the Grenet Foundation and the Ian Potter Foundation

The project’s initial research phase, conducted in partnership with the University of New England, involved a survey of more than 750 respondents. Further qualitative interviews were conducted with 32 participants who had cared for someone after they had attempted suicide. 

The You are not alone resource was tested in workshops conducted with people who have supported a partner, relative or friend after a suicide attempt. This was done in partnership with the University of Sydney.

Expected outcomes

The impact of the You are not alone resource, as well as its dissemination plan, will be evaluated in 2020.

Further information

Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information about the Better Support project.

Read or download the full report below:

Better Support: Understanding the needs of family and friends when a loved one attempts suicide (PDF 812KB)

Additional Info

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  • Category Title You are not alone
  • Category Text

    Information and advice about caring for someone who has attempted, or is at risk of attempting, suicide.

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  • Category Image Alt Text two people hugging

With the spread of the internet and the decline in use of traditional media such as newspaper and radio, podcasts have exploded in popularity over the last few years.

The aim of this PhD study is to identify whether listening to a podcast can reduce stigmatising attitudes towards people living with complex mental health issues.

This project began in June 2020.

The study is funded by the National Stigma Report Card project, which is led by SANE Australia in partnership with the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences with the support of the Paul Ramsay Foundation.

Study 1: Podcasts and Mental Health Survey

The aim of this survey was to understand the behaviours, attitudes and preferences of podcast listeners regarding different types of podcasts, including podcasts on the topic of mental health. It was also designed to understand the relationship between listening to podcasts and different aspects of mental health.

This study is now complete. Read a summary of the findings here.

Study 2: Co-Design and Anti-Stigma Podcast Research (CASPR) Study

The aim of this co-design study was to bring key target audience members together to inform the development of a new podcast. This new podcast aims to reduce stigmatising attitudes towards people living with complex mental health issues.

The study is now complete. Read a summary of the findings here.

Expected Outcomes

This study will generate new information about how podcasts can be used for stigma reduction initiatives.

Results will be published in a PhD thesis and may also be published in a peer-reviewed journal or presented at a conference.

Team Members

    • Elise Carrotte
      PhD Candidate, University of Melbourne
      Senior Research and Evaluation Coordinator, SANE Australia
    • Professor Lisa Phillips
      Primary Supervisor
      Director Professional Programs, Associate Head of School, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Michelle Blanchard
      Former Deputy CEO, SANE Australia and Director, Anne Deveson Research Centre
      Special Adviser, National Mental Health Commission
      Honorary Senior Fellow, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Christopher Groot
      Research Lead, National Stigma Report Card
      Director, Telehealth and Stigma Lab – Brain and Mental Health Hub, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Fincina Hopgood
      Lecturer in Screen Studies - Faculty of Humanities, Arts, Social Sciences and Education; School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, University of New England

Further information

Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information about the project.

Additional Info

  • Item Page Full Width No
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  • Category Text Exploring whether listening to a podcast can reduce stigmatising attitudes towards people living with complex mental health issues.
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  • Category Image Alt Text Podcases and mental health - man listening to podcase on headphones

People who live with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders experience high rates of stigma and discriminations across a range of life domains.

Although these disorders have been shown to frequently co-occur, little is known about how experiences of stigma and discrimination differ between people who live with single vs dual diagnoses of each.

The research

The aim of this PhD is to compare how Australians living with schizophrenia spectrum disorders – both with and without co-occurring AOD use disorders – experience stigma and discrimination in their relationships, and how these experiences are informed by public stereotypes.

A series of surveys involving both people who have lived experience of these mental health issues and members of the general public will be conducted to explore these questions.

This PhD began in June 2020 as part of the National Stigma Report Card project, which is led by SANE Australia in partnership with the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, with the support of the Paul Ramsay Foundation.

Expected Outcomes

The findings of this PhD will support efforts to better understand the experiences of people living with dual diagnoses of schizophrenia spectrum and AOD use disorders, as well as helping to inform related stigma reduction efforts.

Team Members

    • Beth Hobern
      PhD Student, University of Melbourne
      Research Assistant, Telehealth and Stigma Lab – Brain and Mental Health Hub, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Michelle Blanchard
      Former Deputy CEO, SANE Australia and Director, Anne Deveson Research Centre
      Special Adviser, National Mental Health Commission
      Honorary Senior Fellow, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Christopher Groot
      Research Lead, National Stigma Report Card
      Director, Telehealth and Stigma Lab – Brain and Mental Health Hub, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne
    • Dr Imogen Rehm
      Research Fellow, National Stigma Report Card
      Honorary Fellow, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne

Additional Info

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  • Category Text How do people living with schizophrenia, with and without AOD use disorders, experience stigma and discrimination?
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  • Category Image Alt Text Podcases and mental health - man listening to podcase on headphones

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